Caring about animals and caring about humans don’t rule each other out: Anna Morozova (the Baltics)

“Social and political movements which have equality and compassion in focus are important to me. Compassion in the widest meaning of it, be it to fellow Earthlings, or to planet Earth in general, or to other races, genders, alternative lifestyles, what not. I might say a strange thing, but I think that tolerance is not enough. You can tolerate and secretly hate something or someone at the same time. Compassion and empathy go a longer way, in my opinion. Of course, veganism and third-wave feminism are important. Extinction Rebellion is important, even if I am not involved too much. Various kind of environmental actions, be it within Let’s Do It! frames or otherwise. Those promoting human rights and creating opportunities.”

Putting love and respect for the animals into drawings: Weronika Kolinska (MENIMA; PL/NL)

“Animals are unique, they have personalities. I try to draw animals as individuals and I want to show other people how I see them – beautiful, majestic beings, deserving of our respect. I have also illustrated my favorite vegan poem about the milk industry to depict some of the standard practices, like taking the calves away soon after birth, killing the calves for veal and killing the cows when they are “spent”. I’m proud to say that those illustrations reached and touched a lot of people.”

Promoting vegan, feminist and environmental messages on film and also behind the camera: Melanie Light (UK)

“There is something which is like an addiction from working in the film industry, I love it as form of art and creativity. It is really hard, long hours and can fuck with your mental health but I feel like there is nothing else I could do with myself. I am working hard to get myself into a position where I can use my platform of film making to spread messages and awareness of positivity.”

Advocating for a better world for animals, one art piece at a time: Jane Lewis (UK)

"Non-human persons can teach us to respect and to live in harmony with the planet’s natural environment, and to take from nature only what we really need. Humanity is in the final stages of polluting and destroying the environment for ego and greed. We would do well to look to other animals as examples of how to live with instead of against nature."

Challenging cultural and social norms: Aaron Glasson (US/NZ)

“I used to be very engaged in animal rights and veganism. At that time I never felt like I was doing enough and to be honest was an angry person. Some people can live that life and do amazing things for the cause. For others like myself I need to prioritise my own personal wellbeing before I can be proactive. I still do what I can, when I can, but spend time and money on myself too. I acknowledge I could do more, and will strive to while still enjoying existence.”

Normalising veganism in Glasgow: Craig Tannock (UK)

“I think that I have mostly been mostly inspired by a growing awareness over the years of just how wonderful animals are. Their joy of life is truly inspiring, whilst their capacity to feel pain and sadness is heartbreakingheart-breaking. I have no choice but to do what I can to help. I cannot walk on oblivious to their plight.”