Rap is also a feminist thing: Éloïse Bouton (FR)

“To me, feminism is the basic idea that everyone should be treated equally: women, men, trans, non-binary, racialized people, sex workers, the elderly, people with disabilities, … I see it as a part of a wider struggle against cisheteropatriarchy.”  

Bridging art to the existential threat of atmospheric carbon overload: Allegra Searle-LeBel (US)

“Resisting consumerism, which is especially hard when we’re told that the way we can make anything better is by buying something.”  

Promoting reducing, reusing and recycling: Annika Hentrich (BicicloLab; DE/IT)

“Every item we buy has a past and a future, and therefore an impact on people and nature. We should inform ourselves about its origin and have an awareness of what happens to this product when we get rid of it.” 

Talk “Why vegan feminism” — come and join!

Let's have a discussion about vegan feminism!

Drum beat: welcome to join the Tallinn Vegan Fair 2019 – come and say “Hello”!

Welcome to say “Hello”, and ask questions about veganism!

A feminist rapper whose music is 100% about inspiring the listener: Kellee Maize (US)

“I feel drawn to support marginalized individuals, those who are systematically subjected to social injustices, just for being born who they are. I am also passionate about supporting the environment and try to live as green as possible in my everyday life.”

Believing in being the change you want to see in the world: Corline aka Coco De Los Muertos (Cry Baby Tattoo Belgium; BE)

“Art is the mirror of the society that can make you think differently, showing what is not usually showed.”

Advocating for a better world for animals, one art piece at a time: Jane Lewis (UK)

"Non-human persons can teach us to respect and to live in harmony with the planet’s natural environment, and to take from nature only what we really need. Humanity is in the final stages of polluting and destroying the environment for ego and greed. We would do well to look to other animals as examples of how to live with instead of against nature."

Come to the Women’s March held in Tallinn on 19 January 2019!

The Women’s March is a one-time action which stands for the righs of women regardless of their background. This is the first time the march is taking place in Estonia.

Making people smile: Maarika (Teacup Goblins; EE)

“I want my art to make people smile. It's not a huge goal but it might just make a small difference in someone's day. To me that's good enough.”

Pointing out social injustices and alternatives: Alex (roots of compassion; DE)

“For me being active doesn’t necessarily mean torching slaughterhouses or liberating animals, even though these methods can be absolutely appropriate. The main form of activism we engage in as a collective is education, through books, blog entries, messages on stickers, patches and T-shirts. We financially support projects that have a more direct and militant approach (e.g. the occupiers of the Hambacher Forest in Germany) and write about their actions because in our opinion different forms of activism have to go hand in hand if we want to have an impact.
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As a long-time activist, whom I once met at the Animal Rights Gathering, put it: “You are not the movement, you are part of the movement.” I would like to add: “Take care of others and fight for their rights, but also take care of yourself.””

Giving voice to a vegan community through graphical messages: Jacky Wasserman (US)

“As a vegan seeing how the movement and community has grown over the past 5 years has been so inspiring. I love hearing from friends that want my advice to go vegan because they saw a documentary or heard about how much the environment is affected or they love animals too much. Helping people transition and just being me without really doing anything but leading by example has been the most effective thing I think.
As an entrepreneur, creating a community of badass women boss babes that collaborate and support each other has been so rewarding. Cultivating and creating relationships with other business owners is a must. We all can relate!”

Challenging cultural and social norms: Aaron Glasson (US/NZ)

“I used to be very engaged in animal rights and veganism. At that time I never felt like I was doing enough and to be honest was an angry person. Some people can live that life and do amazing things for the cause. For others like myself I need to prioritise my own personal wellbeing before I can be proactive. I still do what I can, when I can, but spend time and money on myself too. I acknowledge I could do more, and will strive to while still enjoying existence.”